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ARC/The Mad Scientist’s Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke
Book Provided by NetGalley and Angry Robot
Publication date: February 7, 2013

Synopsis from Goodreads: The Mad Scientist’s Daughter is the heartbreaking story of the journey from childhood to adulthood, with an intriguing science fictional twist.

There’s never been anyone – or anything – quite like Finn.

He looks, and acts human, though he has no desire to be. He was programmed to assist his owners, and performs his duties to perfection. A billion-dollar construct, his primary task is to tutor Cat.

When the government grants rights to the ever-increasing robot population, however, Finn struggles to find his place in the world.

 

AH’s Review – 4 Skulls – A-

I enjoyed Ms. Clarke’s The Assassin’s Curse so much that when I saw another book by this author, I jumped at the chance to read it. The Mad Scientist’s Daughter is a very different read. It starts off quite pleasant and innocuous, then as the story progresses, it gets a little dark. The story revolves around Cat Novak (the mad scientist’s daughter) and her friend/tutor/companion Finn. The book follows Cat throughout her life from a very young and innocent childhood, her turbulent teens, her college days, her marriage, divorce, and life as a mother. Throughout her life, the one constant is Finn.

The writing is beautiful. Ms. Clarke has a wonderful way with words. I was enthralled and I really could not put this book down. Parts of the story moved me to tears, other parts had me shaking my fist at the obtuse Cat. The world building was intricate. The world was very similar to ours, but more technologically advanced. It was sort of futuristic and sort of not. Due to weather changes, there was a reduction in population and shortages. Permits are required to travel outside certain areas.

As for the characters, I adored Finn. He kind of reminded me a little of Data from Star Trek. It took me a while to realize what he was and why he lived with Dr. Novak and his family because for the first part of the book Finn is described through the eyes of a very young Cat. She first thinks he is a ghost. As she ages, he is a close family friend, someone she can depend on. Yet Finn has feelings and each time Cat leaves, he is lonely.

I loved Cat as a young child. Her innocence and wonder were very sweet. As she grew older, I could not help but dislike her. She always seemed aloof, almost an Ice Queen. Cat just didn’t seem to care about her relationships with others. In the meantime, the adult Cat has become an accomplished artist. When she realizes how much she misses Finn, she focuses on creating a piece of artwork especially for him. The love and care she took preparing this piece of work was touching.

While I loved this book, I am not sure that it is for everyone’s taste. Personally, I enjoyed it and would recommend it to anyone who likes a little robot love story. I can’t wait to see what Ms. Clarke comes up with next!

Rating:  ☠  ☠  ☠  ☠  ☠ 

Thank you to NetGalley and Angry Robot for a review copy of this book.

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AH

AHHi all! Bonjour! I’m AH and I am obsessed with reading. I read all kinds of books, but my favorites are paranormal romance and urban fantasy. What is it about those vampires and shape-shifters? Lately, I seem to be reading a lot of dystopian books as well. Are zombies the new vampire? I hope not. I have 3 boys – all reluctant readers so I tend to read a lot of young adult books aimed at boys. I want them to catch the reading bug too! I’m looking forward to sharing my thoughts about books with you. Hope we can discover some great reads together.
 Posted by on January 21, 2013 at 7:00 am

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